Differentiation vs. standardization

This article on differentiation from Nell Noddings isn’t new, but it is worth sharing. What kinds of conversations are you having about differentiation at your school? Would this article be worth a read with your colleagues?

Starting the year off strong

I could not resist featuring these wonderful interviews about the first days of school on Education Week. My favorite part was Rick Wormeli’s recommendation to start the year off with high expectations and challenging content. Which pieces resonated with you?

When I become a teacher….

Some of you may have seen this video created by educators at a staff development experience: Some of these statements relate directly to differentiation and personalization. My favorite is “I want to lecture all day”. To me, it reminded me that nobody really wants to teach without joy or inspiration. Sometimes, we just need ideas, […]

Using DI in PE

Do you find it is difficult to find high-quality examples of differentiation in physical education? If so, you may want to explore this article by Kathleen Ellis, Lauren Lieberman, and Dani LeRoux featured on the American Printing House for the Blind. They not only categorically break down the various ways to differentiate, but they provide […]

Hand signals

You’ve probably heard about using hand signals in the classroom in order to cut down on disruptions. Penny Pinching Teacher shares a few that she uses with her fifth graders, like three fingers shaped in a ‘w’ to signal when they need water, and holding a pencil in the air when they need to have […]

Make them move in math

Trever over atĀ Future TeacherĀ reminds us of the importance of incorporating movement and physical activity into your high school lessons. He shares a list of activities to incorporate into your math lessons to offer students the ability to move around while they learn math. People graphs are a fun suggestion to use when learning about parabolas, […]

TODD’S TECH TUESDAY: Do you have the time?

Today’s tip is a 2-for-1! I just love the Adapting Creatively blog; it is written by the mother of a young lady with Rett syndrome. She includes so many practical tips for home life and teaching and the idea we are featuring today-the use of visual timers-can actually be used in both situations. Visual timers […]

What students want

Students usually know what the teacher wants but do you know what your students want? The bold and clever teacher at teachitwrite recently asked her students to share their top requests of teachers on a piece of paper. The top three responses she received were:

Visual schedules, reminder strips and more

If you have students with autism or other disabilities who need the help of visual supports, you may want to examine the photos and examples over at Do2Learn. Picture schedules and visual directions can help students become more independent, learn unfamiliar tasks, and reduce their anxiety about new routines (e.g., checking a book out from […]

FUN FRIDAY: Anyone can juggle

Adding juggling to your PE curriculum will not only help students work on attention and eye-hand coordination but will provide them with a cool new skill they can show off to friends and family. And since juggling can be adapted for almost any learner, it is the perfect activity for the differentiated classroom.